Bankruptcy Paralegal - The Role and Job Description of the Bankruptcy Paralegal LDA



Bankruptcy Paralegal - The Role and Job Description of the Bankruptcy Paralegal LDA

The Bankruptcy Paralegal is an assistant that specializes as an assistant to a bankruptcy attorney. They have to be well-versed in every aspect that is pertinent to bankruptcy law. Bankruptcy law is the process that entails an individual filing the various chapters to acquire relief from many types of debt and delinquent accounts. Bankruptcy law entails quite a bit of research, documentation, investigation, communication, and diligence. This is one of the main reasons that bankruptcy paralegals are so valuable for what they do. There are many tasks and jobs that paralegals of this nature perform throughout various cases. However, most of them include many of the same categories of actions.

Bankruptcy Paralegal Job Description:

Interview. The bankruptcy paralegal usually assists in conducting the interviews with prospective clients and people resorting to file some sort of bankruptcy. Often, the attorney will allow the experience bankruptcy paralegal to conduct most of the interview, and if not the case the legal assistant will be present to take copious notes of the entire interview and to serve as a liaison for the client and lawyer.

Investigation. The bankruptcy paralegal normally works with the debtor and attorney by investigating all the said debts involved with the case. This could mean evaluating credit reports, finding the necessary information about transactions, loans, debts owed, speaking with creditors in behalf, and making evident assets that the client may have.

Filing the necessary paperwork- A great deal of a bankruptcy paralegal’s job is to set up the hearings, make notations of the interviews and investigative procedure, speaking with the creditors and recording and preparing all documents that may be included. Setting up depositions, hearings, meetings, and more.

Serving and notifying- The bankruptcy paralegal is responsible for making sure that all creditors are notified of bankruptcy proceedings, hearings, and court dates. The assistant also makes sure that any garnishment orders, and creditors are aware of the actions that prevent creditors from taking further actions to collect the debts owed.

To become a bankruptcy paralegal most candidates must go through an paralegal school program, and have the necessary skills such as an eye for detail, computer skills, great communication ethics and tact, research and writing skills, and basic secretarial knowledge. Even though it is not mandated, a paralegal may become certified in the career. In addition, internships and hands-on training can assist a paralegal to further their careers in specializing in a particular subject. Bankruptcy paralegals commonly have to possess initial knowledge of the different types of bankruptcies and everything that is included in the specific niche. However, some attorneys will train and hire a candidate with the right experience and potential.

Paralegal’s do a great deal of work to help the attorneys they work for. The only exceptions to their job descriptions are actually practicing law by leading the court hearings, and engaging in practicing in law. They work behind the scenes to lessen the burdens of work upon the lawyer. Although, they should be considered in high-regards for their abilities to take care of things and get the job done. A bankruptcy paralegal career is the type of career that will persevere through any economy and bankruptcy paralegals will always be demanded in society with the millions of people who need them to prevail against insurmountable indebtedness.


Bankruptcy Paralegal - The Role and Job Description of the Bankruptcy Paralegal LDA

Bankruptcy Paralegal

The National Federation of Paralegal Associations defines a paralegal as "…a person qualified through education, training or work experience, to perform substantive legal work that requires knowledge of legal concepts and is customarily, but not exclusively, performed by a lawyer. Paralegals may be retained or employed by a lawyer, law office, governmental agency, or other entity or may be authorized by administrative, statutory or court authority to perform this work." Paralegals adhere to recognized ethical standards and rules of professional responsibility.


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